Plank variations for a power-packed core

One of the best isometric exercises to shape your body, we show you five plank steps to achieve a killer core.

Stuck at your standard plank pose and not sure what you can do next to work your core harder? There are many plank variations that you can try to maximize your core muscle workout. We reveal five variations from easy to hard, so you can master each pose one at a time, before advancing to the next one.

Here’s step one and it’s perfect for novices. Let’s go!

Forearm plank

Forearm plank: instead of resting on your palms, lower yourself to rest on your forearms. (Picture repost from Imgarcade.com)

A beginner’s plank pose, the forearm plank is slightly easier than the standard plank. Instead of resting on your palms, lower yourself to rest on your forearms at shoulders width apart. You can hold your hands together or rest them flat on the ground, with your forearms parallel to one another.

Don’t forget: Always maintain a straight posture. Focus on tucking that tummy in and tight to get your abdominals working. Your back should not be curved downwards and your butt should never stick out.

Walking plank

Now that you have mastered the forearm plank pose, it’s time to shake things up a bit with the walking plank. There are different ways to do the walking plank:

Alternate between your standard and forearm plank pose in an up-and-down motion. In a standard plank position, lower one arm down to your forearm before lowering the other to assume the forearm plank pose. Proceed to push your body back up with one hand, then the other to get back to your standard plank pose. Another method is to keep your body in a standard plank position and start to walk your hands forward and backward while keeping your core engaged.

Side plank

Side plank: your body should form a straight line without your hips dipping down. (Picture repost from Popsugar.com)

Start on a standard or forearm plank pose, lift your hips up and turn to the side, placing one leg on top of the other while balancing on your top foot. Your body should form a straight line without your hips dipping down.

The thing with isometric exercises is that you tend to hold your breath. Remember to keep breathing!

Side plank with leg lift

Ready to bring your side plank pose to the next level? Maintaining your side plank position, raise your top leg up without bending your knee. Lower your leg and repeat, then move on to the other side. Make sure your torso is stable and does not sway as you move.

Plank hip dips

With your obliques, shoulders, back, arms, legs and glutes all worked out, let’s make the last one count. Maintaining a forearm plank pose, dip your hips to the side towards the ground.Lift back up, then repeat on the other side. Finish by giving yourself a good stretch. Great job. Go grab a cup of Morning Boost Tea and celebrate.

Have you tried other planking variations before? Share with us by commenting below.

Feature picture repost from Blog.swell.com.

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